Saturday, April 08, 2006

More on the "Gospel of Judas"...



More on the "Gospel of Judas" from Rev. Paul T. McCain...
The Gospel of Judas: Yawn! Same-old, same-old Well, here we go again. Somebody finds a Gnostic "Gospel" and suddenly the media jumps on it as if it is the downfall of Christendom. When I used to be a parish pastor, I would visit my dairy farmers on their farms early in the morning sometimes. In the Winter, there would be steam rising from piles of material left behind by cows. Let the reader understand. Well, this is precisely what all this hype over the Gospel of Judas is all about: a big old pile of steaming nonsense. Here is a very well done rebuttal of recent media coverage of this issue, by Dr. James White, It is all over the news today, as predicted (and, obviously, planned, given the date). "The Gospel of Judas Contradicts Christian Belief!" "Judas was Doing Jesus' Will!" "Christianity Shaken!" Blah, blah, blah. When you get your historical and theological information from Katie Couric on the Today Show, well, you'll buy anything. When I was responding to Bart Ehrman's media blitz on his book, Misquoting Jesus, I repeatedly emphasized the need for every-day Christians to start studying these sources so as to be able to provide a meaningful response in an ever more anti-Christian context in Western Society. Well, here's another example. For those who have already realized Bart Ehrman's "if they said Jesus once, they were Christians" mythology makes no sense, this is another second century gnostic writing, like Thomas or Mary. Judas was one of the favorites of the gnostics; this gospel is gnostic to its core; gnosticism is utterly incompatible with anything that can seriously be called "Christian." End of story. Explain to the guy on the bus who just saw the Today interview (which had zero meaningful content). Go on with your daily service to Christ. But, of course, not only are most Christians completely and utterly unaware of gnosticism, Nag Hammadi, aeons, dualism, etc., but they are likewise easily troubled by the culture's invocation of the holy and authoritative phrase, "scholars." Bart Ehrman is having to guzzle Starbucks to survive all the interviews he is doing today, all the while promoting his key argument: early Christianity was a mass of self-contradiction, and what we have today was just one small sliver that somehow managed to survive to predominance. And hence, due to lack of discipline and foundation, many are left wondering about the very foundations of their "faith." Let's set the record straight right off the bat...

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